No Name

Published on Jan 15th, 2014 by Pastor Ed Hlad | 0
No Name

No Name

I often wonder when God does not include a name for someone in the Bible if we are supposed to insert our name into their story? Is God keeping their name out of the story in order for us to better relate to that person and thus see the work of God in their life as an example of the work of God in our lives? In II Kings 4, we meet a lady who was wealthy. She was generous with her wealth but she had no son. It seems, by looking at II Kings 4:17, that she had given up hope of having a son. Elisha prophecies that God will give her a son; and, a year later, she had a son. When the child became older, he was in the fields with his father and he had a great headache. He died later that day while laying on the lap of his mother. His mom went straight to Elisha who then came to her home and raised him from the dead. Later in life, Elisha warned of a coming famine and urged the woman to leave her land and go somewhere where there would be food. The woman did so and left her home for seven years. While gone, her land was seized. This may have happened in a number of ways… the King needed land, the one she left in charge failed their assignment, etc. When she came back she was given an audience with the king. It just so happened that at that time, the king was curious about all that Elisha had done; so, he was asking Gehazi, Elisha’s servant and a leper, all that Elisha had done. Gehazi tells the king about Elisha raising a child from the dead and the woman comes to the king and asks for her land back. The king meets the woman and the boy (maybe the dad has passed away) and gives her back her land and all the crops she missed while away.

I must admit that I was aware of the story of Elisha raising the son from the dead but had forgotten about the restored land part of the story. I was struck by the amazing provision and protection of the Lord in this woman’s life. I believe this story could have gone another way. The woman has money but no son. She becomes angry at God and his representative and instead of providing for the man of God she sends him on his way with no provisions. If that would have been the case would we have the rest of the story? What if, instead of running to God, which she did when she went to Elisha, she ran away from God when her son died? What if she did not want to leave her home but held on to it too tightly when Elisha warned of the coming of the famine? She could have refused to see that leaving her house was a provision of God.

Aren’t our lives just like this woman’s life? They are a roller coaster of circumstances and events that can be read in so many ways. The truth is, that as an adopted child of the King of Kings, our Father has promised to provide for all of our needs. If we read our wealth as a sign of his blessing; but, the lack of a son as a sign of a curse, then we will be like a yo-yo in our faith. If we read that God loves us because he provides a son but hates us when the son dies then we will miss his provisions of comfort and grace. If we hold so tightly to that which we have or think we are in this world then we may miss God’s miraculous provisions later.

God has promised to finish his work in us; so we are able to trust that whatever He brings in our lives is designed to grow us into the image of his Son. We cannot, though, prove the truths that He has so graciously given to us (He will never leave us nor forsake us, nothing can separate us from the love of God, every good and perfect gift comes from Him, etc) by the events of our lives. They are proven by the work of Jesus on the cross and they are secured in us by the work of the Spirit of God in our lives. Staying obedient and faithful through the roller coaster ride of life simply allows us to see how He works in every situation of life for his glory.

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